Search:  
Rupert Grint Press Archives

Harry Potter star Rupert Grint: The ‘ridiculous’ money I was paid tested my friendships

Main-Rupert-Grint

Swapping higher education for Hogwarts, pocket money for pay packets and school corridors for red carpets, Rupert Grint’s childhood was anything but regular.

And after 10 years in the hit Harry Potter movies, the young star earned enough money never to have to work again.

Exactly how much money, though, is a good question – Rupert says he doesn’t have a clue.

While he and his co-star Emma Watson are estimated to each have been paid around £25million for the eight films, he still, to this day, reckons he does not know the full amount.

“It was kind of ridiculous what we got,” he says.

“And I must admit I don’t actually know how much I earned – the exact number.

“I’ve always known it was kinda ‘there’, and I’ve got quite an active involvement in stuff like that now, but I don’t really know the exact figures. And I’ve never really wanted to.

“I’m quite a laid-back person and not overly ambitious, really.”

He may have no burning desire to top the annual Forbes rich list but Rupert has not done too shabbily for a man of 26.

With two multi-million pound companies to his name – Clay 10 and Eevil Plan Properties – he probably won’t be claiming benefits any time soon.

But with overnight childhood celebrity, came teenage angst.

He struggled to weed out genuine friends from hangers-on and, similarly, he got stung by girls who only wanted to date him for his fame and wealth.

Harry-Potter-and-the-Philosophers-Stone-November-2001

He says with a sigh: “It was a tricky thing. You’d always worry whether it was a genuine thing – and I think that goes with any kind of relationship, even friendships.

“It took me a while to figure out whether someone was genuine or they had ulterior motives.

“I’ve had a few bad experiences and it was tricky because I left school at quite a pivotal time, in Year 7, when you’re just making friends and stuff.

“So whenever I came back, bonds I had made before had all got a little bit weird.

“I did lose a few friends but on the whole it’s all been pretty good.”

With three homes and a bank balance most of us can only dream of, the down-to-earth star reluctantly admits he need never work again.

So why does he? And why choose the stage which, as every actor knows, invariably pays the Equity equivalent of minimum wage?

“I just love what I do, trying new things and scaring myself once in a while,” he explains.

“I loved doing the Potter films but it’s so nice to try different characters and explore different things. It’s been weird since Potter finished, adapting to life now. It was such a huge part of us.

“For now I am just enjoying being free. It was a bubble world, and quite suffocating. A bit like a school, really. Now I’m out I still feel there are things I want to do.”

One of these things, of course, is make his debut on Broadway.

On Thursday, the Essex-born star, incredibly polite and gentle-mannered in real life, takes to the stage in Terrence McNally’s farce It’s Only a Play.

Starring alongside such Tony and Oscar-winning luminaries as Matthew Broderick (Mr Sarah Jessica Parker), Homeland star F Murray Abraham and The West Wing’s Stockard Channing, he is, understandably, a little nervous.

The-all-star-cast-of-the-upcoming-Broadway-play-Its-Only-A-Play

Living out his formative years on the big screen, and becoming a household name in the process, Rupert also feels burdened by the weight of expectation.

“It’s very scary,” he admits. “Broadway does feel like a much bigger event and I know there’s a lot of expectation.

“I do feel under pressure. I feel like I’ve got quite a bit to prove. I am out of my comfort zone here and am the least ­experienced out of everyone on stage.

“During the first few days in rehearsals I was really intimidated because it’s quite a group of people. But there are no big egos. Being on stage is a real team thing, and everyone has been great, really cool. I
just feel really lucky to be a part of it.”

Playing Frank Finger, a barnstorming wunderkind theatre director, his latest role is a world away from amiable, bumbling Ron Weasley. “I basically play a psychopath,” he says. No doubt Professor Snape would have had a field day.

Rupert had no formal acting training but was cast in Harry Potter: The Philosopher’s Stone at 11 after sending in a video of himself rapping to children’s show Newsround. He made the final movie, The Deathly Hallows: Part 2, when he was 22.

In 2002 he won his first leading role in British comedy Thunderpants, four years ago he co-starred with Bill Nighy and Emily Blunt in Wild Target, then his first major post-Hogwarts project was a 2012 anti-war film, Into the White.

Last year he made his West End debut in Jez Butterworth’s play Mojo and his latest movie, Charlie Countryman, is out at the end of this month.

Despite the obvious lure of Hollywood – and he is chatting from a rented apartment in Manhattan – Rupert has no plans to up sticks and leave the UK for good.

“I like England – it’s my home,” he says.

Helping him feel at home in the Big Apple is a new addition to the Grint household – a tortoise called Madeleine. She’s not named after anyone in particular (no money-grabbing ex-girlfriend?) – she “just looked like a Maddie”.

When I ask him about a current girlfriend, there is an awkward pause.

Refusing to crack, I stay silent until poor Rupert fills the silence with a giggle and “Erm, no… well, not really, er, yeah…”.

When I suggest it’s early days, he laughs, and confirms, “Yes, early days maybe”. Rupert is not your typical former child star. With no stint in rehab or quarter-life crisis, he is by all accounts incredibly popular with anyone he has ever worked with.

In the words of his co-star Broderick: “He is really sweet… so hardworking and diligent, and to see a young fellow get his first Broadway shot is just a pleasure to watch.”

But now that he is all grown-up, the actor is busy getting serious. Despite attending a Catholic primary school, St Joseph’s in Hertford, he has recently been toying with different religious ideas.

Rupert-Grint

He’s read evolutionary scientist Richard Dawkins’s bestseller The God Delusion and says: “Religion is something which has always fascinated me. I went to a Catholic primary school but I’m not a Catholic.

“But I was quite a god-fearing little boy. They instilled it in me. I mean, the stories were always so terrifying.

“And then when I grew up a bit I kind of realised there are other things out there, and other theories.

“What I believe now changes all the time but I’d never say I was a complete atheist, or unaccepting of anything.

“I’m kind of struggling with that. I don’t know, it just fascinates me, the universe in general.”

Speaking of exploring the planet, Rupert is keen to take some time off next year and head off on holiday.

“I’m exhausted,” he admits. “But at the moment, I can’t really think much beyond this time next week.”

So how does he switch off?

“Drawing,” he smiles. “I’d like to go into animation one day. I draw a lot, a lot of disturbing cartoons – it helps me unwind.

“I also have a couple of weird, pre-show rituals which I’ve only recently noticed. I blow bubbles.

“You know – those little pots of bubbles you got as a kid. Blowing bubbles is just the most relaxing thing before a show.

“My character also wears a lot of make-up so putting my eyeliner – or guyliner – on has become a bit of a ritual too. I’m getting quite good at it.”

As he is at this whole acting lark, it seems…


Original article found here:mirror.co.uk | October, 3rd 2014

View The Next Article

Rupert Grint talks about his splashy Broadway debut and looking back (or not) on his Harry Potter years

image

It’s been a dramatic year for Rupert Grint. The man who will forever be Ron Weasley to legions of Harry Potter devotees made his professional stage debut last fall in a London revival of Jez Butterworth’s thriller Mojo. (Notices were mostly positive for his jittery portrayal of a thuggish speed freak named Sweets.) Now Grint is on Broadway, in an updated version of Terrence McNally’s 1986 showbiz comedy It’s Only a Play, set at the chaotic opening-night party of a new Broadway show. Of course, Grint isn’t the only Harry Potter alum to have tested his talent onstage. Daniel Radcliffe has starred in three Broadway shows in the past six years. Grint’s Great White Way debut, however, places him in the middle of a seasoned ensemble that includes Nathan Lane, Matthew Broderick, Megan Mullally, Stockard Channing and F. Murray Abraham. The morning after his 26th birthday, a friendly but low-key Grint talked about his Broadway debut, a prospect he deemed “quite scary.”

How did you end up in this production? Were you looking to come to Broadway?
It’s something I’ve always wanted to do, ever since my first taste of theater last year in the West End, when I did Mojo. This just kind of came up. I was quite hesitant at first, but it’s such a fun play and a great cast that I had to do it.

You were hesitant?
Yeah, just because of the scale of it. I thought I might be a little bit out of my depth. Everyone in this cast is so experienced—people I’ve watched while I was growing up—it was quite overwhelming. I remember on the first day just looking around the table, thinking, Oh, my God, this is real. But it’s been a really good rehearsal process, and I feel comfortable. They all know comedy so well.

Your character, Frank Finger, is this wunderkind director who feels like his work is a sham. It’s nothing you relate to, I hope?
[Laughs] No, not quite. He’s not like other characters I’ve played before. He’s quite over-the-top and angry. He’s been praised since leaving RADA for everything he’s done, and he’s a bit sick of all the attention and the rave reviews. He’s already been knighted. He wants a bad review to kind of get him back on track. And he’s a kleptomaniac. It’s a fun character.

He’s also British. That’s new from the original.
The script has had a lot of updates to include social media and the way people view reviews now. It’s interesting to see people read reviews about themselves. I don’t think audiences think about that when they read reviews: about the person that it’s about. Watching a group of actors and directors reading reviews is quite an interesting thing.

Do you read your reviews?
I avoid it whenever I can. It’s scary.

Is this your first time in New York for an extended period?
Yeah, it is. I used to come over almost every year for Harry Potter promotional things, one week here and there, but this is the longest I’ve been here. Sometimes I do feel quite far away from home, but it’s a great city, it’s got such energy. I’m really enjoying it.

Is it hard to be out and about here, or do you just blend in?
It depends on where you go. I have managed to kind of blend in. People want pictures, but nothing too crazy. It’s quite manageable. I wear a hat to cover my hair as much as I can.

I guess that is your most identifiable feature.
Or people think I’m Ed Sheeran.

Yes! I read that you play along when people think you’re him.
I do play along.

Did you catch Daniel when he was in The Cripple of Inishmaan?
When it was in England. He was great. My other friend was in that as well, Conor MacNeill. It’s quite inspiring. Whenever I’ve watched Dan, he’s just completely alive. It’s great to see him up there.

Daniel said recently that he didn’t like looking at his work in the Harry Potter films. Do you have a similar response?
I don’t really look back on them. I don’t really watch them. Occasionally I catch glimpses when they’re playing on TV. It’s like watching high-quality home videos, watching me grow up. It’s quite strange. I’m really quite proud to be a part of them. They were a huge part of our lives.


Original article found here:timeout.com | September, 2nd 2014

View The Next Article

We Explore The Harry Potter Studio Tour With Rupert Grint, Tom Felton, Warwick Davis And The Weasleys

Harry Potter, the most successful film franchise of all time, has kept fans thrilled for decades and now Hogwarts is set to open its doors to the millions of Muggles who want a piece of the magic, by way of an authentic studio tour.

For a first look at what it will be like, The Huffington Post UK were invited to the place where JK Rowling‘s phenomenal books were brought to life – Warner Brothers’ Leavesden Studios, just outside Watford.

This is where all eight Harry Potter films were made, plus the place the young stars grew up with their characters.

We met Tom Felton (Draco Malfoy), Rupert Grint (Ron Weasley), Bonnie Wright (Ginny Weasley), James and Oliver Phelps (Fred and George Weasley) in their previous on-set classroom. With them were their older co-stars Warwick Davis (who played both Professor Flitwick and Griphook), Nat Tena (Nymphadora Tonks) and Mark Williams (Arthur Weasley), to talk about the making of the films and how they feel about the studios turning into a world famous attraction.

Over 100 million pounds has been invested in turning the studios into a place capable of receiving the millions of visitors who want to see a piece of magical movie history. And some of the most memorable sets from the films will be on show, including Dumbledore’s office (home of the Sorting Hat and the Sword of Gryffindor), the boys’ dormitory (where the child actors outgrew their beds and could only be filmed sitting up in them in the last films), the Cupboard under the Stairs at 4 Privet Drive and the Great Hall.

All of the sets have been painstakingly moved across from old buildings on the site, including the Great Hall, with its heavy wooden doors, statues, and real York stone floor, which had to be un-laid and pieced back together, like a jigsaw.

However, the studio at present is still very much a building site, so with a hardhat and high-vis jacket adorned, we made our way around cautiously. But even when the building work is finished, visitors shouldn’t expect to enter the world of Harry Potter as it appeared on screen.

“You only usually see what the camera shows in the films and people assume what’s behind the camera is the same thing, but it’s not. It’s usually a bunch of people drinking tea and coffee and this tour paints that whole picture, which I think is really important”, explained Felton, who at the age of 24 knows more about film-making than most adults.

The studio tour plans to be a gritty, realistic behind-the-scenes look at the scale and detail of the sets, costumes, animatronics, special effects and props used in all eight films. The scaffolding will be left up and the prop cages won’t be hidden, plus there will be green-screens and rigs to show how Quidditch was really played.

If you thought the pupils at Hogwarts could fly, you might find yourself a little disappointed.

Talking about the labour that went into creating the sets, Davis said: “There’s things people will have never seen having watched the film, but if you come down to the studio tour here you can actually see stuff up close, like the parchments actually have things written on them.”

Davis was right. Walking around Dumbledore’s office, we learned that the old, intelligent-looking books lining his walls had great detail on them, even if they had been made from old phone books, as our guide explained.

Felton, who is thankfully very unlike his nasty character, said: “Even things they knew for a fact would never be seen on camera would be detailed, the designers were so passionate that they wouldn’t leave it, they would do it for their own satisfaction.”

Praising the people behind the film, who made it possible for the young inexperienced actors to feel like they were in a magical world, even if they didn’t get the same red carpet adoration as the franchise stars, Davis said: “A lot of the time it’s like real magic, the set is built and then these people come in and dress it and transform it and we walk in to film on a set like that and it’s all there in place.

“They’re the unsung heroes and I think that’s what the studio tour is all about, this is their time to show off their work.”

For the Potter actors at the press launch it was the first time they’d been back at Leavesden since the final film’s wrap party.

One-half of the cheeky Weasley twins, James Phelps, said: “The last scene we filmed here had the bulldozers waiting outside to get started and when we came in today it’s totally unrecognisable.”

Although the buildings and the layout of the studios have changed, Felton reassured us: “The sets are just as I remember them.”

Tickets to the tour will cost about the average for a theme park, at 28 pounds for adults and 21 pounds for children. However, there won’t be adrenaline-packed rides to match, so what do the cast think is the most impressive part of the tour?

For James Phelps it’s the Great Hall. “That’s the part that people always think of in Harry Potter,” he explained. “When we walked in there today it was really surreal, I remember going in there one day and thinking that they were knocking it down and that was it, it’s still really impressive.”

Davis agreed: “The Great Hall is so impressive and for me, who has worked on the film, there’s a lot of memories there. But for people like yourself who’ve grown up with the film it’s kind of iconic, you think of Hogwarts you think of the Great Hall, so many things have happened there, from the feasts, the sorting hat, a funeral, the Yule ball. In the last film you see it partially destroyed, so it’s quiet nice for us going back in there and seeing it restored.”

Grint, who, along with Daniel Radcliffe and Emma Watson, worked across most of the sets in the studios, said: “The ministry of magic is really impressive too, you get the sense of the size.”

Wright, who played red-haired Ginny Weasley, Harry Potter’s love interest and the envy of plenty of teenage girls globally, added: “We’ve only seen a bit of what’s being created they’ve still got to put in our kitchen and there’s going to be a room celebrating all the things that creature effects and the art department did.”

Returning to the place where fantasy became reality must bring back some great memories for the cast?

“I remember the first time I walked into the Great Hall and it was all floating candles, I think Dan actually hyperventilated,” mused Grint.

Williams, best known as the Weasley’s father Arthur, confirmed the young actors’ amazement: “You could see it on their faces when they were little, there were plenty of times, particularly on the big sets, where they weren’t acting. They came in and you could see them go ‘wow, we’re in this film’ on their faces.”

For Felton, being back on set reminds him of his Potter family, “I think everyone assumes that it was a fed Warner Bros. line, us saying we’re all a family and get on very well, because it sounds like something they would tell us to say.

“But in my experience it’s very true and I really think fans will feel that when they come here. It wasn’t just a place where the films were made, it was a real place of joy and happiness for the 500 people that got to work here everyday.”

A more skeptical mind might think Warner Bros. are creating this studio tour purely for financial reasons – they know they are going to make millions from visitors for years, if not decades, to come. However, the cast all seem extremely pleased with the venture and see it as a place for all the fantastic things that were achieved over the ten years of Harry Potter production to be sealed in history.

“This as an extraordinary piece of investment and commitment from Warner Bros. and it’s right and proper, considering what the Harry Potter franchise has done for them. It has happened very quickly and has needed no prompting, so that’s a very heartening thing. There’s no bad feeling there,” Williams reassured us.

Harry, Ron and Hermione’s magical story might have come to an end on the big screen, but the fans’ experience of Hogwarts is only just beginning, as Felton explained: “The kids faces are going to be priceless.”


Original article found here: huffingtonpost.co.uk | October 14, 2011

View The Next Article

Page and Screen – In Praise of Rupert Grint

Page and Screen – In Praise of Rupert Grint
Liam Trim with the latest edition of ‘Page and Screen’…

With the all conquering Harry Potter franchise drawing to a close after a decade of record breaking box office figures and immeasurable sales of merchandise and DVDs, reams are being written attempting to sum up the reasons for the worldwide phenomenon. Recipes for success are being compiled and suggested as Warner Brothers and other studios look for the “next Potter” to lure audiences consistently to cinemas on a huge scale. Children’s authors are being assessed and targeted as execs wonder where to find the next J.K. Rowling. Meanwhile the super rich writer has launched a new website to continue the Potter brand, “Pottermore”, and has revealed that she has waited, perhaps wisely, until after the last film to publish several projects she’s been working on for some time since finishing The Deathly Hallows.

Some say that Rowling’s immense imagination and wonderful writing accounts for the success of the films. The sheer detail of the books helped create a wizarding universe that went beyond the plots. However up and down the country it’s easy to find English teachers, experts and ordinary readers that will think little of Rowling’s talent. Of course she clearly has an ability to create worlds and engaging plots but she is also reliant on influences and is far from a genius writer. Whilst I was sucked in by the books after reading them, unlike my school friends I only embraced The Philosopher’s Stone after seeing the film version, which convinced me Harry Potter wasn’t as childish as it sounded.

Perhaps the fact that Warner Brothers conceded artistic control to British based Heyman Productions ensured the appealing flavour of the series? There are no doubt many different reasons for the spellbinding effect Hogwarts has had on box offices internationally, but as someone who has grown up in the eye of a decade long magical storm, the Harry Potter films transcend the usual critical criteria. As rankings of the films appear all over the web, I have found myself reflecting on the franchise as a whole.

If I had to pick out one key reason for its success it would be the way the films have matured with their audience. Those behind the films deserve some credit for this but if anything they haven’t lived up to the darker depths of the books, until the final film if you believe the early reports from critics. It was Rowling’s masterstroke to pen seven stories that evolved in tone as well as plot. However watching the films has delivered the genuinely unique experience of seeing three child actors grow into young and talented adults, which mirrors the maturing mood of the stories.

Daniel Radcliffe and Emma Watson tend to hog the headlines. He has become a leading man and she has gone from prissy bookworm to stunning, sexy and intelligent model, capable of juggling a demanding degree from a top university with filming and an increasingly diverse career. Recently though, as Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows: Part 2 premiered in Trafalgar Square, the newspapers reserved special mention for the huge cheer that greeted Rupert Grint.

Grint has always been more than the long suffering ginger one. In the early films, when Radcliffe was excruciatingly awful at times in the lead role, Grint provided much needed comic relief and more, with a skill beyond his years. Respected film veteran John Hurt dubbed him a “born actor” and allegedly directors beyond Potter, such as Martin Scorsese, have predicted a bright future for him. In this early screen test, Grint is the clearly the most expressive of the famous trio, inhabiting his role even when he doesn’t have lines to read, unlike the blank faced Radcliffe and two dimensional Watson:

But then a combination of the stresses of the lifestyle change and scripts that let his character down reduced Grint to a predictable and subdued comic presence during the films in the middle of the series. Radcliffe and Watson both grew in confidence to take on more integral and convincing roles in the drama. The final film ought to have plenty of opportunities for Grint to go out with a bang big enough to showcase his true talent though, with the will-they-won’t-they romantic chemistry between Ron and Hermione finally coming to a head and several dramatic moments to sink his acting chops into. Grint has certainly demonstrated his promise elsewhere with performances in Driving Lessons alongside Julie Walters and wild teen drama Cherrybomb.

We’ve been through a lot with Harry, Hermione and Ron and got to know not only them, but a little of the actors that portray them, on the way to their final showdown with Lord Voldemort. Harry Potter will always be a great deal more than just a shadow hanging over the careers of Radcliffe, Watson and Grint. They will all try to shake it off and it will be remarkable if any of them completely succeed. I for one though have a feeling that out of all of them it is Rupert Grint we are still yet to see the best of. He was a lovable Ron but as someone else we haven’t heard of yet he is going to blow us away.


Original article found here: Page and Screen | July 21, 2011

View The Next Article

‘Harry Potter’ director: ‘Rupert Grint is coolest guy I’ve met’

David Yates has said that Harry Potter star Rupert Grint is the coolest person that he has ever met.

Yates, who directed the final four entries in the long-running fantasy saga, made the comments at a special premiere event for the release of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2.

“Rupert Grint, ever since I’ve known him, has probably been the coolest person I’ve ever met in my life,” Yates told the Los Angeles Times.

“He has a hovercraft [and] an ice cream van. He’s really laid back, but quietly quite smart.”

Yates also had positive things to say about Grint’s fellow Harry Potter stars Daniel Radcliffe and Emma Watson.

“Daniel is a bit of a workaholic, he loves work, but he’s [also] a very decent, curious, funny, lovely young man,” he added. “Emma is a little like Hermione. SHe’s very tough on herself. She’s incredibly bright.”

The director also revealed that he saw Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone director Chris Columbus at an event recently, and thanked him for selecting such good actors to play the three lead roles.

The final Harry Potter film was released this weekend and has already broken first-day domestic box office records.


Original article found here: digitalspy.co.uk | July 17th, 2011

View The Next Article

Actors tell all

From egos to evil, ‘Potter’ cast answer pop quiz from fans

“Harry Potter” fans Ally Martin and Mackenzie Fitch got to spring a pop quiz on the star pupils at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.

The 11-year-olds from Olcott, N.Y., near Buffalo, brainstormed questions for the Associated Press to ask during interviews with Daniel Radcliffe and other stars of the “Harry Potter” films.

Along with Radcliffe, who stars as teen wizard Harry, the girls relayed questions to Emma Watson and Rupert Grint, who play Harry’s pals Hermione and Ron, and Tom Felton, who plays his rival, bad boy Draco.

The final film, “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2,” opened Friday.

Daniel Radcliffe

Q.Do you like the movies being pretty much all about you? Did you like all of the attention?

A. Well, yes, I am a massive egomaniac. … Do I like it all being about me? Well, I can’t really say ‘no’ … I suppose it’s a nice feeling to know that you’re an important person on the set. But to be honest with you, I think any actor that views actors as the most important people on the set are so deluded, because there are literally millions of actors all over the world. There are many more actors in the world than there are Steadicam (camera) operators, so we are, logically speaking, a lot more expendable. So no, I don’t say I like it all being about me. It’s just the way it was. I was just the one that looked the most like Harry when they were auditioning people.

Q.Are you like your character in a lot of ways?

A. It was funny, when my mum read the sixth book, she said, “It’s weird. It’s sort of like Jo (“Harry Potter” author J.K. Rowling) does sort of know you a bit now. … When Harry argues and he gets on the defensive, he becomes really irritating like you do.” So I think in that way, when we’re on the defensive, we both tend to get more belligerent. … Other than that, we’ve both got a lot of curiosity. We both put a lot of value in our friends. I think we’ve both got quite the sense of humor.

Q.Is it hard for you to end the series, because most of your acting career has been as Harry?

A. Having watched these amazing actors for 10 years, having learned so much, it’s now kind of time. My education is complete, and it’s now time for me sort of to be released in the wild and see how I function in the real world.

Emma Watson

Q.Does it get annoying when the main characters are boys and you are the only girl?

A. When I was younger, I did struggle. I wished for a girl on set a lot, actually. There are times when I did feel really left out.

Q.Because you bossed Daniel and Rupert around in the movies, did you ever do it accidentally in real life?

A. Oh, all the time, all the time! Definitely. They’ll tell you that I definitely bossed them around at times. Sometimes, I accidentally found myself directing, giving them direction on a scene that we’re doing together. I’d have to catch myself, because I’m like, that really isn’t my job. I really shouldn’t be telling them that.

Q.Since you had a cat in some of the movies, do you actually like cats in real life?

A. I love cats. I’m such a cat person. I actually miss my cats so much. I grew up around them. … Being around cats, it really calms me down.

Q.Do you wish you were your character? Do you wish you were magical and could get away from the real world?

A. These questions are brilliant. I don’t know, actually. Having watched this last movie, the magical world is pretty dark. It seems quite scary. I don’t know whether it would be fun. Do I wish I was my character? No. I’m pretty happy being Emma. I’m pretty content as Emma.

Rupert Grint

Q.Do you like the character you play? Is he like you?

A. I’ve always been quite fond of Ron. Always felt a strong kind of connection to him when I was reading the books. … When you’re playing a character like this for so long, you do kind of bring a bit of yourself into him. I think we’ve merged into the same person over the years. It’s quite hard for me to kind of separate us now.

Q. Would you change him if you could?

A. He’s always been quite cool. I suppose maybe if he was a bit braver, occasionally. A few more heroic moments would be quite cool.

Q. Do you think the movie Ron or the book Ron is more like you?

A. I suppose the movie Ron, really. It was – it is me, really.

Q. Is it hard for you to end the series, because most of your acting career has been as Ron?

A. Yeah. It’s going to take a while to kind of get used to that. I think there’ll always be a bit of Ron in me. It’s just not having that routine, I think, is going to be the weirdest thing. Just not seeing these people and going in every day is going to take me a while to come to terms with. But I’m ready to move on.

Tom Felton

Q. Is it hard for you to be nice in the real world when you’re so mean in the films?

A. I think it actually makes me slightly nicer. I think I get to vent my day-to-day frustrations and annoyances through this Hitler-like child, and by doing so, it seems to be quite therapeutic. And hopefully, I’m a slightly friendlier soul.

Q. Are you a bit like your character in a way (no offense)?

A. I’m glad they said no offense, because I get a lot of genuine journalists saying, “How similar are you to your character?” … God, I hope I’m not anything even remotely close, other than in the way we look. I think we’re polar opposites. I like to think of myself as a fairly un-Draco-esque character.

Q. You played a major role in Dumbledore’s death but didn’t actually kill him. How do you feel about that?

A. It was never in Draco, really. The task was never going to be performed by him. … Granted that he set it up and that whole journey led him to where he is now, where he thinks, I don’t want to do this anymore. And as fixated as he was on becoming this chosen one of the dark side, it was that one event, actually, I think, seeing Dumbledore going before his eyes. I really enjoyed the shots of afterward, where you see the sort of evil team leaving Hogwarts, with Draco as sort of this lost child, looking at things around him, thinking, I don’t want to leave here. This is my home, this is my sanctuary, or at least somewhere I feel safe. And from that day onward, he’s banished. So it’s a real sad time for Draco. I feel deeply sorry for the poor boy.


Original article found here: journalgazette | July 19th, 2011

View The Next Article

Rupert Grint: ‘Harry Potter Hermione kiss felt wrong’

Rupert Grint has revealed that he felt so nervous about kissing his Harry Potter co-star Emma Watson that he asked David Yates for directorial help

The actor – who plays Ron Weasley in the wizarding franchise – explained that it felt “weird” having to kiss his friend of ten years.

He told SciFi Now: “I was really worried about that, because in some ways the romance, and particularly the kiss, just felt like it was wrong.

“But once we were on set it was fine, because David was really good about giving us a long chat before we did it. It ended up being fine; kind of a fuss over nothing.”

Rupert added that the best thing about his embrace with Watson’s alter ego Hermione Granger was that it was over so quickly.

Watson also recently said that she felt “awkward and weird” kissing her Harry Potter co-stars Daniel Radcliffe and Rupert Grint.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 is out now.


Original article found here: digitalspy.co.uk| July 18th, 2011

View The Next Article

What the ‘Harry Potter’ Cast Said When They Started Out Ten Years Ago

The release of ‘Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 2‘ has prompted many weepy farewells, not just from fans, but from the three actors who are bidding both their childhoods and the franchise goodbye. The tumultuous emotional journey that they (and we viewers) have taken over the course of eight movies and ten years is something they couldn’t have imagined when the movie series launched a decade ago.

I know because I interviewed Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson and Rupert Grint in 2001, when they were on their first press tour to promote the first movie, ‘Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.’ At the time, they were bright-eyed, enthusiastic pre-teens, kids who felt like the luckiest ‘Harry Potter’ fans in the world for being granted the privilege of acting out their favorite stories. They knew they were going to spend their teen years filming the next six books (three of which J.K. Rowling hadn’t even written yet). There was only a hint of the serious, poised adults that the actors (and their characters) would become.

Still, re-reading their remarks a decade later, it’s easy to see traits of Hermione in the young Watson (intellectually curious), of Ron in Grint (fun-loving, a little goofy), and Harry in Radcliffe (thoughtful, modest, well aware of the heavy responsibility placed on his slender shoulders). Looking back, it’s touching to see the naive enthusiasm with which they approached what turned out to be a massive undertaking that would occupy half their lifetimes, as well as to marvel at how much of that childlike wonder seems to have survived in them after a decade of working hard, enduring unending scrutiny and bearing the weight of the hopes and dreams of hundreds of millions of fans.

Were you a fan of the ‘Harry Potter’ books before you auditioned?
Daniel Radcliffe: I really enjoyed them but I wasn’t really obsessed. But then I reread them when I got the part, and now I am completely obsessed.

Rupert Grint: I was, like, the biggest Harry Potter fan before I even knew it was going to be a film.

Emma Watson: I was already in the middle of the third one when I started auditioning, and I finished the fourth by the time I got the role. So I’m a major Harry Potter fan.

How did you land your role?
RG: I was a fish in Noah’s ark in the school play, and now I’m in ‘Harry Potter.’ It’s a big step. I first found out about the auditions in Newsround. They said to send in some information about yourself and a photograph. So I sent one in and waited weeks and weeks and weeks, and nothing happened. I really wanted this part because I was the biggest Harry Potter fan at the time. I went on the website of Newsround, and some of the kids had been sending in videotapes of themselves reading from the book. So I made a videotape. First, I dressed up as my drama teacher, who’s a girl, so that was kind of scary. Then I made this rap song of how much I wanted to be in the film.

How did you learn you had been cast?
DR: I was sitting in the bath, and I heard the phone ring, and I heard my dad go downstairs, pick it up, and say, ‘Hello, David.’ David Heyman, the producer, was the only David we knew at the time. So I knew it was him, but I thought it was going to be a let-down phone call to tell me I hadn’t got the part. But my dad then came up and told me. I just sat there for a while, and then I started to cry. Then I woke up at 2 a.m. and thought it was a dream.

How are you like your character?
RG: I felt like I could relate to Ron because we’ve both got red hair, we both like sweets, we both are scared of spiders, and we both have got lots of brothers and sisters. I have one brother and three sisters.

EW: I enjoy school but I’m not obsessed with school. I really enjoy sports. But I’m not obsessed. I’m not obsessed. Hockey, rounders, tennis. I play for my school.

Having become famous before anyone really knows anything about you, do you feel more akin to Harry now?
DR: I can relate to Harry in other ways, but not that way. I’m loyal. I enjoy being with lots of people, but I also enjoy being on my own. I’m curious. I can stand up for myself.

Is it true that you were a practical joker on the set?
DR: There was this one time when it was getting on to Halloween. I’d gone out and bought these blood capsules, vampire things. You put them in your mouth and chew them, and you let the blood dribble down your chin. I went to the makeup bus, and they have these steel steps outside. I whacked them really hard with my hand to make it sound like I’d fallen. Then I rushed in and spit blood all over the floor. If David Heyman had been there at the time, I think he may have died.

And I changed the language on Robbie Coltrane’s phone to Turkish. [Of this prank, Coltrane, who plays Hogwarts gameskeeper Hagrid in the series, recalled: “I have a Motorola, and it has 17 languages in it, and the wee bugger went into it and found Turkish and changed it. So you’d think [to fix it] you could just go into ‘language change,’ but of course to go into ‘language change,’ you have to know the Turkish for ‘language change.’ So we had to phone-up one of the makeup guys had married a Turkish girl. It was like an episode of ‘Fawlty Towers.’ At the time, it was very funny.”]

What did you think of the completed film?
DR: Again I was speechless. And again I cried. But I’m not a wimp. Don’t let that mislead you.

The red carpet at the London premiere was mobbed. What was that like?
RG: It was scary.

EW: I really enjoyed myself. At the beginning, the red carpet was pretty freaky. But once we got inside, I really enjoyed the film.

DR: It was terrifying. It was really great fun, but it was very scary. It was great meeting all the famous people. That was cool.

Which celebrities were you most thrilled to meet?
DR: Ben Stiller. I met Ben Stiller, Robin Williams, Susan Sarandon and Tim Robbins, which was very cool.

Is the attention from press and fans a downside?
DR: No, this is actually one of the coolest bits. If I had to pick one, it’s writing the autographs. My name is too long. I’m going to try to work on it to get a quicker signature. I do enjoy [being recognized]. My teacher always said I was an attention seeker.

How many reporters have you talked to recently?
EW: Oh my God.

RG: I’ve lost count. About three million.

Do they all ask the same questions?
RG: Yeah, but it’s cool.

EW: They come up with exactly the same questions, and you can say exactly the same answers. So you don’t have to think. You can just stand there like a broken record.

What has been the biggest perk?
RG: What does perk mean?

EW: I’d say going to different places. We went to loads of different locations, which was really fun. We met interesting people. And we had really good co-stars, i.e., Maggie Smith, Robbie Coltrane, Zoe Wanamaker, Julie Walters. It was just a great cast.

RG: For me, probably the sweets.

EW: I make this long, sobby speech, and he says, ‘Sweets.’

If you could have a magical power in real life, what would it be?
DR: Probably invisibility. Then I could sneak into rock concerts and films.

EW: I think I’d make myself invisible so I could go into movies for over-15s.

RG: Yeah, I’d be invisible so I could sneak out of detention.

You’re about to start filming the next movie, ‘Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets.’ What can you reveal about it?

RG: It’s going to be fun. I can’t wait to cough up slugs.


Original article found here: moviefone.com | July 17th, 2011

View The Next Article

Rupert Grint gets sent pyjamas by fans

Rupert has played the affable and wisecracking character Ron Weasley in Harry Potter since the film series began in 2001. While his co-star Daniel Radcliffe and Emma Watson get deluged by fan mail Rupert was stunned to find that his presents mainly consist of pyjamas, and he has racked his brain in an effort to figure out why.

“It depends where you go. There are crazy people everywhere,” he told Bliss. “America is probably the favourite place for that. I do get sent pyjamas a lot, which is quite interesting.”

In a bid to avoid typecasting Rupert is keen to play someone miles away from Ron, and was once linked to starring in a biopic of infamous flop skier Eddie the Eagle.

“Doing something completely different does sound quite appealing, maybe playing someone not even ginger! I’m quite up for changing my hair colour,” he explained. Someone a bit evil, a bit crazy. I’d quite like to play a big character.”


Original article found here: musicrooms.net| July 16th, 2011

View The Next Article

‘Harry Potter’ Finale: Why Did Rupert Grint Walk Out?


Spoiler alert: “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 2” is a tearjerker.

While fans already expect to walk into the theater Friday with a box of tissues in hand, the “Potter” stars were a bit surprised to find that watching the final film in the series could bring them to tears — or at least make them choke up. Viewers will likely find the movie emotional on two levels, because the story itself has tragic elements and because its release marks the end of a decade-long film series.

Even though the actors finished filming the movie more than a year ago, they said there were still scenes in “Deathly Hallows, Part 2” that made them fight back tears. Rupert Grint said that, despite the fact he’s seen the movie twice, he had to walk out of the theater during the London premiere last week.

“I caught a bit. It is really sad,” he told MTV News.”There’s a scene where all three of us are on the bridge after the battle, the castle is on fire … there’s a weird parallel between that and our lives. That always gets me.”

For Tom Felton, it was the epilogue scene that concludes the movie that almost brought him to tears. That scene has especial emotional resonance for him because his real-life girlfriend, Jade Olivia, plays the wife of his character Draco in the flash-forward sequence. But it was actually Daniel Radcliffe’s scene between Harry and his children at King’s Cross station that affected him the most.

“There was something really nice about seeing Daniel with his kids at the end. I really thought Daniel did a marvelous job of being older. I got a bit emotional about that,” Felton said. “Even though it’s funny, it was really quite sad to think that, ‘Christ, our lives have flashed before our eyes. We’re old!’ ”

Radcliffe also told MTV News that he found scenes in the film “heartbreaking,” especially Alan Rickman’s performance during Severus Snape’s flashback sequence.

Beyond the film, Felton said he nearly cried during Radcliffe, Grint and Emma Watson’s heartfelt goodbye speeches at the London premiere last week. He had to talk himself through it, saying, “Just keep it together, Tom, just keep it together,” but according to the “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” actor, it was a close call.

“[The speeches] were really quite special,” he said. “I was really touched by that. I could have easily let myself go.”


Original article found here: mtv.com | July 11th, 2011

View The Next Article