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Rupert Grint Press Archives

Harry Potter ready to cast his final spell


With the massive impact the Harry Potter movies have had over the last decade, it’s difficult to conjure up the image of an anxious David Heyman.

But the Potter producer admits he was “incredibly nervous” about the future of the franchise just before the inaugural movie, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, opened in 2001.

“I couldn’t even get a two-picture deal before the release of that first one,” he recalled while promoting Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows — Part 1 in London.

He has no worries now as the much anticipated Deathly Hallows — Part 2 opens on July 15. The blockbuster is poised to set box-office records, which will likely include surpassing the North American opening weekend of The Dark Knight, a staggering US$158.4-million.

Still, Heyman confesses that he has mixed emotions just like the films’ fans — a combination of sadness, celebration and frenzy befitting the dramatic conclusion to an iconic string of movies.

The great news for all concerned is that the series seems to be going out with a bang. In the finale, wizard Harry Potter (Daniel Radcliffe) confronts the evil Lord Voldemort (Ralph Fiennes) in a momentous showdown. “Part 2 is like a big opera with huge battles,” director David Yates says.

Of course, this last instalment in the series also features the long-awaited kiss between Hermione (Emma Watson) and Ron (Rupert Grint), while their burgeoning relationship offers much needed comic relief from the unrelenting tension.

“We go off on this little adventure together,” Watson says. “It’s kind of like a comedy act because it’s the first time that you see them in tune.

“I really enjoyed the experience. Rupert is a great comedic actor, and so we had a really good time bringing the humour out of everything that we could.”

There’s also a graduation at the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, which includes “lump-in-the-throat” nostalgic sequences.

Some ghostly apparitions recall family and friends from the past. And, an ethereal Dumbledore (Michael Gambon) presents himself to expose mind-boggling secrets from his younger days.

Still, the epic wand duel between Harry and Voldemort is the climactic set piece. It’s rejigged from the book to include a chase through the halls of Hogwarts and a mind-boggling brawl in which the “apparating” combatants appear and disappear.

Most pundits predict that Part 2 will be the best Potter picture yet. “It’s the perfect way to sign off,” says Heyman, a former studio executive who first saw film potential in J.K. Rowling’s books. Indeed, he was the optimistic filmmaker who persuaded a skeptical Rowling to do movie versions of her novels before they became a global phenomenon. He was also the stubborn movie maven who resisted studio demands to Americanize Potter, and backed Rowling when she insisted on the English setting and an English cast.

All the fretting seems moot now. Rowling has set worldwide publishing records, selling more than 450 million copies of the seven-book series. The eight films, based on the novels, will likely hit a box-office total of US$7.5-billion by the time Deathly Hallows — Part 2 runs its theatrical course this summer.

Even more amazing is the fact that multiple directors have nurtured the film versions of the books, which became darker and more threatening as they progressed.

American director Chris Columbus, who made his mark with the Home Alone movies, introduced Potter to the film world with Philosopher’s Stone and The Chamber of Secrets.

Mexican director Alfonso Cuarón brought a furious flair to The Prisoner of Azkaban. Brit Mike Newell took on the fourth, The Goblet of Fire, and added foreboding to the narrative.

Former British TV director David Yates arrived to heighten the tautness, in the fifth Potter movie, The Order of the Phoenix, then The Half-Blood Prince and the two-part finale.

Radcliffe credits Yates for refining the performances in the pictures by quietly expecting more from his three lead actors.

“He was always telling us that we could do better,” says Radcliffe, currently receiving raves for his headlining role in the Broadway musical How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying.

By the time they approached the acting demands of both Deathly Hallows pictures, Yates had them ready for great challenges. “It really was a natural progression,” Radcliffe says. “It didn’t feel like we were being asked to make a massive leap. It felt like we were being allowed to do what we had been preparing to do for the last two or three years.”

Watson agrees that the director raised the acting bar from The Order of the Phoenix onward. “The thing about working with David Yates is that you always hear this word truth, and finding the truth, and being honest and real,” she says. “He wants it to be from the heart. Because of that, I think that made us better.”


Original article found here: arts.nationalpost.com| July 10th, 2011

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Exclusive Interview: RUPERT GRINT JOINS DUMBLEDORE’S ARMY’

Written by EMMANUEL ITIER

Ron Weasley grows up and fights against Death Eaters and Lord Voldemort in the new Harry Potter

Things are getting dark for Harry Potter in the new film HARRY POTTER AND THE ORDER OF THE PHOENIX. Lord Voldemort returned at the end of the last film, and a fellow student was slain, and yet there are few back in the wizarding world that believe the tale Harry Potter has to tell. Alone, more than ever before, Harry find out who his true friends are and bands together with them to form Dumbledore’s army to confront the growing darkness in their world. Rupert Grint plays one of Harry’s best friends Ron Weasley, and he is more than ready to stand by him come what may. iF MAGAZINE got to have a chat with the readily recognizable red head about what the POTTER films have meant to him and the best thing he has bought with his money from the movie franchise.

iF MAGAZINE: I would like to ask what is it like to initiate a new director?

RUPERT GRINT: All the directors have kind of always been quite different as well, so it’s always quite sort of exciting to meet the new ones. We’ve had some pretty good ones. Yeah, yeah… we’ve been lucky

iF: Growing up with this character, have you found that its influenced you in real life, the way you are today?

GRINT: Yeah, to me it’s really weird sort of looking back on all the films. It just seems like one long big film. It’s sort of weird looking back at the early ones — just sort of how young we were and how much we’ve changed now, it is really weird. But no, we’ve really enjoyed it. It’s been a really good part of my life and I’ve really enjoyed it.

iF: Have any of you had JK Rowling autograph your books?

GRINT: Well, actually I already did. She went and signed my first book.

iF: With your POTTER paycheck, what, if anything, have you treated yourself to over the years?

GRINT: Oh, well recently I got an ice cream van. Sorry that’s really bad.

iF: There is so much speculation about the book. So how would you feel if your character doesn’t make it?

GRINT: I wouldn’t really mind if it was a really cool scene, and I die in a really cool way. In a way it doesn’t really matter because it’s the last one. I think I’d like to sort of survive. I heard rumors going around about what’s going to happen, so I’m really looking forward to seeing what the outcome is.

iF: How easy did you find it to become leaders and teachers of Dumbledore’s Army?

GRINT: I’ll tell you Ron isn’t really either Harry or Hermione. I really liked doing these scenes because they were really good fun and there was a really good atmosphere on the set. And we got to do loads of stunts as well, which was really cool. Yeah, and I got pulled back on a wire because Hermione and me have a duel.

iF: After HARRY POTTER what would you like to be doing next?

GRINT: I haven’t given it much thought, to be honest, but I’d definitely like to continue acting and I’d like to see what goes from there, really. If it doesn’t work out, I’ve still got the ice cream van!

iF: Does each film having a different director have a different feel on the set or do they all sort of run together?

GRINT: Yeah, I felt that this time around it was a lot more relaxed and David sort of makes you feel really calm because he’s really laid back. Definitely a contrast with Mike Newell.

iF: Can you talk a bit about the audience and how it may have changed over the years?

GRINT: I don’t know, really. I think it’s a kind of varied audience, I suppose. It’s quite for– obviously, it’s quite for the younger ones particularly, and also they’ve probably grown up by now. When you get recognized, I’ve always had people say good things about the films and I’ve always had good feedback from the films.

iF: Which is your favorite scene in the film and why?

GRINT: Well, I don’t know, really. There are loads of scenes that are really fun. I think the funniest one to sort of do and watch back was the Hall of Prophecies, because that was–There was nothing there. There was no set at all. It was all a green screen and nothing. And looking back and watching it is, like, really weird but– yeah, that was pretty cool.


Original article can be found here at iFMagazine I July 13, 2007


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Rupert Grint Makes Ice-Cold Indulgence

Jamie Portman, CanWest News Service

LONDON — Rupert Grint has bought himself an ice-cream van — and he couldn’t be happier.

He may be in the money thanks to the role of Ron Weasley in the Harry Potter films, but so far that van is his one big indulgence.

Costar Emma Watson, who plays Hermione Granger, is green with envy.

“When you say ‘ice cream van’ it’s not just the shell of an ice-cream van,” she says. “It’s got like real ice cream and sweets and toppings. I can’t believe I haven’t seen it yet. I really want to see it.”

Grint assures her that she will. He used to follow ice-cream trucks as a kid, and now that he’s 19, he figures owning one is a good investment in case this acting gig doesn’t work out over the long haul.

“I haven’t given it much thought, to be honest, but I think I definitely want to continue acting,” Grint said. “But I don’t know, so I’ll just see where it goes from there, really — and if it doesn’t work out, I’ve still got the ice cream van!”

After he passed his driving test five months ago, he didn’t buy a car — he went out and found an ice-cream van which would meet every child’s expectations.

In many ways, this teenager with the engaging grin and unruly red hair is the most down-to-earth of the the three Harry Potter stars. He’s candid about his lack of acting experience when he joined forces with Daniel Radcliffe and Emma Watson for the first film, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. That movie marked his professional acting debut, and at the time, Grint was unsure whether he wanted to continue playing Ron to the end of the seven-film cycle. Now it’s certain that all three will remain — in fact they start work this autumn on the sixth movie, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.

Meanwhile he had a ball working on the current instalment, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, opening July 11.

“I really liked doing my scenes — they were really cool,” he remembers. “It was a really good sort of atmosphere on the set and you got to do loads of stunts which is pretty cool.”

He reveals that in one sequence Ron and Hermione fight a duel. “Yeah, and who wins?” interrupts Watson who’s sitting next to him at the press conference.

Grint thinks that it’s been good for the cast to work with a succession of different directors — Chris Columbus, Alfonso Cuaron, Mike Newell and now David Yates. “It’s always been quite exciting to meet a new one.”

He tends to be recognized often on the street because of his trademark hair, but that’s never been a problem for him. “When I get recognized they always say good things about the film and I’ve always had good feedback.”

But he also finds it weird to watch the earlier films these days.

“Looking back at all the films, it just seems like one big long film,” he said. “It’s weird to look back at the early ones because of how young we were and how much we’ve changed now — but we’ve really enjoyed it. It’s been a really good part of my life.”


Original article found here: The StarPhoenix | July 9, 2007

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Interview with Rupert Grint

From the set in London, we chat with Harry Potter’s Ron Weasley on keeping it fresh, David Yates, the Harry Potter game, and more.

Rupert Grint is among a trio, including Emma Watson and Daniel Radcliffe, who have portrayed the main characters in J.K. Rowling’s seven volume masterwork entitled Harry Potter. He is often portrayed as the comic relief and rather than shirk away or get tired of that reality, Grint seems happy and exactly where he wants to be. In October 2006, IGN.com was among a group who went to the set of the fifth film, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix to chat with Grint and others about their work on the film.

Q: This is the fifth film. How do you keep it fresh and are you still having fun doing it?

Rupert Grint: Definitely, yeah. I quite missed it when we weren’t doing it cause there are really good friends doing this. There’s a really good atmosphere on the set and that’s really why. There’s been a lot of changes on this one, new director, new writer, and that helped a lot to keep it fresh. It’s been a really good one, this one.

Q: How has David Yates’ directing felt different from previous directors?

Grint: Compared to Mike Newell, who did the fourth one, he’s completely different. Mike Newell is really loud and not afraid to swear at you, but he was really cool. David Yates is much more laid back, more quiet, he’s just really good.

Q: You had a scene here where Emma’s character smashes you up against the wall. How did you shoot that? Were you on a rig or something?

Grint: Yeah (laughs), that was really good to do, funny enough. Whenever we get to do stunts, it’s really good. They harnessed me up and basically, what they do, is they get a fat bloke to climb a ladder with a rope attached to a pulley and that sends you back. I didn’t realize that’s how they did it. That was really cool.

Q: Have you done a lot of stunts?

Grint: Yeah, there’s quite a few stunts in that scene but there’s more to come really. We’ve got the thestral stuff. They’re to do a plaster cast of my legs to make this special seat thing for riding the thestrals.

Q: Do you like to do your own stunts?

Grint: Depends on what it is really. If it’s really dodgey, I’ll probably just leave it to the professionals. Whenever we get to do a little thing, it’s really great fun.

Q: How many times did they slam you up against the wall?

Grint: Quite a few takes. Once you’ve done it once, you kind of get used to it.

Q: Did you get black and blue?

Grint: It does give you a bit of a wedgie when you go back, but apart from that it was fine.

Q: We hear that you guys got modeled for the [Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix?] game. What’s that going to be like for you?

Grint: Really cool. It’s really weird, sort of seeing yourself on the game. I play him a lot.

Q: You guys did the voice work for that one too?

Grint: No, we didn’t, which is a bit of a shame really, but it should be good.

Q: We hear that your dressing room is the one everyone hangs out in.

Grint: It’s really cool. I’ve got table tennis, darts, pool, and a really massive TV.

Q: What are your thoughts about Quidditch and Ron’s part being cut out of it?

Grint: It’s a bit of a shame. I was looking forward to doing the Quidditch, but that will come up later. There’s some really other good stuff in this one, I mean you can’t get it all in.

Q: What is your favorite scene so far or what are you looking forward to doing next?

Grint: I am looking forward to doing the thestral stuff. All of the Room of Requirement stuff is really cool.

Q: In the Hall of Prophecies, in the Ministry of Magic, it’s a fully digital set, so you’re acting in a big green warehouse? Are you apprehensive about that because there is actually not going to be anything there?

Grint: It’s going to be quite a new thing really. We’ve worked on blue screen before … so we all kind of got used to that part of it. It’s going to be quite cool. Today we’ve been doing some fighting lessons so that was quite interesting.

Q: Have you done any scenes at Grimmauld Place?

Grint: Yeah, they were really good scenes to do. All the Weasleys were together, so it was good.

Q: Have you had any scenes with Evanna?

Grint: Yeah, quite a lot. She’s really cool. There’s quite a lot of new characters in this one, actually.

Q: This is her first job so how has she been with everyone on the set?

Grint: Good really, yeah. She’s perfect for it.

Q: We talked to the twins a little and they both have ambitions behind the camera. Have you thought about that?

Grint: I haven’t really thought about that really. I want to finish the Harry Potter films definitely and I don’t know really. I did a film after the fourth one called Driving Lessons, just a new low budget thing with no special effects and that was quite interesting. I would like to do some other stuff like that so we’ll wait and see.

Q: In this film, we see you and Harry Potter make the transition into adulthood. Now that you’re older is that something you can relate to a little bit better with your character?

Grint: Yeah, definitely. It sort of makes it easier, I guess. In the last one, that played a big part as we were growing up and had all of the awkward moments in teenage life I suppose. There’s a lot more of that now.


Original article found here: IGN | June 26th, 2007

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Harry Potter 5 set visit – Rupert Grint

Rupert Grint has made a name for himself by playing Ron Weasley, the best friend of the most famous teenage wizard in the wildly popular “Harry Potter” movies. ComingSoon.net talked to Grint about what his character will do in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix.

ComingSoon.net: This is the fifth film. How do you keep it fresh and are you still having fun doing it?
Rupert Grint:
Definitely, yeah. I quite missed it when we weren’t doing it cause there are really good friends doing this. There’s a really good atmosphere on the set and that’s really why. There’s been a lot of changes on this one, new director, new writer, and that helped a lot to keep it fresh. It’s been a really good one, this one.

CS: How has David Yates’ directing felt different from previous directors?
Grint:
Compared to Mike Newell, who did the fourth one, he’s completely different. Mike Newell is really loud and not afraid to swear at you, but he was really cool. David Yates is much more laid back, more quiet, he’s just really good.

CS: You had a scene here where Emma’s character smashes you up against the wall. How did you shoot that? Were you on a rig or something?
Grint:
Yeah (laughs), that was really good to do, funny enough. Whenever we get to do stunts, it’s really good. They harnessed me up and basically, what they do, is they get a fat bloke to climb a ladder with a rope attached to a pulley and that sends you back. I didn’t realize that’s how they did it. That was really good?

CS: Have you done a lot of stunts?
Grint:
Yeah, there’s quite a few stunts in that scene but there’s more to come really. We’ve got the Thestral stuff. They’re to do a plaster cast of my legs to make this special seat thing for riding the Thestrals.

CS: Do you like to do your own stunts?
Grint:
Depends on what it is really. If it’s really dodgy, I’ll probably just leave it to the professionals. Whenever we get to do a little thing, it’s really great fun.

CS: How many times did they slam you up against the wall?
Grint:
Quite a few takes. Once you’ve done it once, you kind of get used to it.

CS: Did you get black and blue?
Grint:
It does give you a bit of a wedgie when you go back, but apart from that it was fine.

CS: You’re into videogaming we hear.
Grint:
I do, yeah.

CS: We hear that you guys got modeled for the game. What’s that going to be like for you?
Grint:
Really cool. It’s really weird, sort of seeing yourself on the game. I play him a lot.

CS: You guys did the voice work for that one too?
Grint:
No, we didn’t, which is a bit of a shame really, but it should be good.

CS: We hear that your dressing room is the one everyone hangs out in.
Grint:
It’s really cool. I’ve got table tennis, darts, pool, and a really massive TV.

CS: What are your thoughts about Quidditch and Ron’s part being cut out of it?
Grint:
It’s a bit of a shame. I was looking forward to doing the Quidditch, but that will come up later. There’s some really other good stuff in this one, I mean you can’t get it all in.

CS: What is your favorite scene so far or what are you looking forward to doing next?
Grint:
I am looking forward to doing the Thestral stuff. All of the Room of Requirement stuff is really cool.

CS: In the Hall of Prophecy, in the Ministry of Magic, it’s a fully digital set, so you’re acting in a big green warehouse? Are you apprehensive about that because there is actually not going to be anything there?
Grint:
It’s going to be quite a new thing really. We’ve worked on blue screen before… so we all kind of got used to that part of it. It’s going to be quite cool. Today we’ve been doing some fighting lessons so that was quite interesting.

CS: Last time we spoke, you were really into metal. What kind of music do you listen to now?
Grint:
Same stuff really. I saw the Foo Fighters a couple of months ago at Wembley arena. I like The Strokes.

CS: Have you done any scenes at Grimmauld Place?
Grint:
Yeah, they were really good scenes to do. All the Weasleys were together, so it was good.

CS: Have you had any scenes with Evanna?
Grint:
Yeah, quite a lot. She’s really cool. There’s quite a lot of new characters in this one, actually.

CS: This is her first job so how has she been with everyone on the set?
Grint:
Good really, yeah. She’s perfect for it.

CS: Did it take her a while to get into the swing of things?
Grint:
Sure, it must have been really scary because everyone knows each other. She’s fit in really well.

CS: We talked to the twins a little and they both have ambitions behind the camera. Have you thought about that?
Grint:
I haven’t really thought about that really. I want to finish the “Harry Potter” films definitely and I don’t know really. I did a film after the fourth one called “Driving Lessons,” just a new low budget thing with no special effects and that was quite interesting. I would like to do some other stuff like that so we’ll wait and see.

CS: Do you have any other non-“Harry Potter” projects that are coming up in the future?
Grint:
There’s quite a big gap now. Usually you just kind of have to try and fit it in between the films, but [after] this one we’ve got quite a big break because Dan has got a theater run. I don’t know, we’ll sort of see what comes up.

CS: Have you read the sixth book?
Grint:
Yeah, I have, yeah.

CS: What do you think about Ron’s relationship with Lavender?
Grint:
Pretty intense! It’s going to be a pretty fun, pretty interesting thing to do.

CS: When J.K. Rowling came to the set, did you get to meet her?
Grint:
Yeah, we did. She’s come out a couple times now. She’s really nice, really down to earth. There’s always a bit of excitement when she’s down.

CS: Has she ever told you things to help you understand your character?
Grint:
No, not really. Just good to sort of see her. She’s really nice and good to talk to.

CS: Has she commented on your portrayal of the character?
Grint:
No, not really, but I think she’s pleased though.

CS: In this film, we see you and Harry Potter make the transition into adulthood. Now that you’re older is that something you can relate to a little bit better with your character?
Grint:
Yeah, definitely. It sort of makes it easier, I guess. In the last one, that played a big part as we were growing up and had all of the awkward moments in teenage life I suppose. There’s a lot more of that now.


Original article found here: ComingSoon.net | June 25th, 2007


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Rupert Grint – Driving Lessons

With only a few school plays to his credit, Rupert Grint infamously won the role of Ron Weasley in the Harry Potter film series with an audition tape featuring a rap that extolled his suitability and desire for the part. Grint filmed a role in kid’s movie Thunderpants thereafter, but the new Driving Lessons offers him a chance to step into more adult roles. I spoke with Grint during his stop at San Francisco’s Ritz Carlton.

Groucho: Do you remember first catching the acting bug, as they say?

Rupert Grint: Yeah, I always sort of—I’d done a few school plays, at school. And I’d always sort of been involved in the drama there. But yes, I’ve always had sort of an interest in it.

G: You don’t know what drew you to it?

RG: I don’t know. Not really. I mean, no one in my family ever really—my dad was once on the shopping channel, QVC, selling stuff. (Laughs.) Yeah, right.

G: In your own school plays, I take it you played a more interesting role than the eucalyptus tree.

RG: (Chuckles.) Yeah, definitely, yeah. It was really good to get into something different—even from Ron, really. It was a lot more, sort of—harder, I suppose. ‘Cause Ron’s mainly just—just looks scared all the time, and this was something really—some really good, different things to go through.

G: How would you describe the character of Ben?

RG: He’s quite sheltered. I mean, he’s from a religious family, and he’s got no friends. He’s a bit of a loner. He goes through quite a journey through the thing. And he sort of comes out of his shells, as it goes on. As he meets Julie Walters, her character, he sort of changes slightly, sort of becomes more independent and grows up a bit.

G: How is it that the Julie Walters character draws him out, do you think? What is he responding to there?

RG: I think—I dunno. I mean, I suppose the first time they met, he’s like—she’s someone he’s never sort of—the sort of character he’s never seen before: she swears, she drinks, she steals things. And she’s just—just I dunno. They just somehow really get on, have this strange friendship. Yeah. Yeah.

G: What’s the status on your own driving? I understand that you passed your test.

RG: Yeah—last week.

G: It took you a while to do that, though, right?

RG: (Laughs.) Yeah—it was my second test. And I’d been learning for too long. It was like—oh, I don’t know how many lessons I had. Just too many—I’ll enjoy driving—it’s good.

G: And it’s not a publicity stunt to delay your driving?

RG: (Laughs.) No, yeah.

G: It would suit the film, wouldn’t it?

RG: Yeah, definitely, yeah.

G: How is driving changing your life? I guess you haven’t had much of a chance to figure that out yet, huh?

RG: Sure, well, yeah, ’cause I only just passed. But yeah, I mean it is completely sort of freedom now. You can sort of go where you want. I’ve got a car, as well. I’ve got a little Mini—Mini Cooper, so, yeah.

G: I heard that you nearly wiped out the crew at one point with the car in the film.

RG: Oh, yeah. We were doing this scene. And I didn’t really get to do too much driving on it. But I mean, I did a few sort of private roads. And we were doing this scene where I had to drive down this sort of hill, park it up, and get out of the car and do something. And this hill—there’s the crew about sort of five foot away from where I’m supposed to be stopping. And, yeah, I drive up there and get out of the car, and suddenly the car starts to roll. Roll towards the crew. And I had to dive in there and pull the handbrake. It was quite close, actually.

G: How did you prepare to play this role? I know it was in part based on Jeremy Brock’s own life. Did you ply him for more details about his own experience?

RG: Uh, yeah, we had a few—the whole cast had a few rehearsals where we did read-throughs. And I went to Jeremy’s house, as well, and we did a few sort of like sessions with him. And he used to talk about stuff, and show me pictures of his—when he was a kid. No, it was really useful, that. And then on the set, as well, he was really good for like—really clear at giving advice on that. Because he wrote it as well. And he sort of, um—it was sort of his story. So he was really good at sort of giving advice on that.

G: One of the themes of the film is how Ben’s faith affects his development, really. How did you see that: in what ways does it help him? In what was does it hinder him?

RG: Yeah, erm. I’m trying to think—it does sort of keep him in this shell, really. And his mum doesn’t let him do anything. She’s really sort of overprotective and quite scary. (Laughs.) Yes, I suppose it doesn’t really help him much, really. Yeah.

G: Do you have a strategy for embarking on a career as an adult actor?

RG: Uh, not really. I mean, I’m just—I want to do the next two Harry Potter films. And just see what goes from there, really. And maybe do some other stuff like this, in between, because it was a really good experience.

G: It’s probably hard to imagine life after Harry Potter, I guess.

RG: I know, it’s going to be weird when it all ends, ’cause it has been a big part of my life, really.

G: When you travel around for films and do press like this, do you get to do touristy stuff?

RG: Yeah, a little bit. But I usually don’t get much time. I mean, this—I’ve never been here before, and I got here last night. And we’re leaving later today, for Dallas or something. So, yeah, it’s a shame we don’t get much more time.

G: I understand you didn’t get on in school. Why is that, do you think?

FG: I dunno! It was—I mean, I liked the sort of social side of it, and my mates, and that. But, um, it was just the learning thing; it was just—I just didn’t find a subject I could really—except for art. I really got on there, but—. And if I could do anything—’cause I can always go back. I mean, I did my final exams, and left when I was sixteen. I can always go back and do a course in something, but I can’t really see it. I mean, ’cause—I dunno, it just didn’t really, didn’t really—

G: And you’re pretty determined to keep at the film, right?

RG: Definitely, yeah, I mean, I really enjoy it. It is good fun. Yeah, it’s good.

G: Do you have aspirations to branch out into ever writing or directing?

RG: Erm, I haven’t thought about it, really. It’s always sort of an option, I suppose, in the future, but I can’t really see it. (Chuckles.) Right at the moment.

G: I know you can’t talk about specifics, but could you describe what your latest director, David Yates, is bringing to the series?

RG: Yeah, he’s really different, actually, to the other ones. He’s much more sort of laid-back, and much more calm—than the other ones we’ve had. I think, he’s really good at sort of giving us—he’s given us a lot more freedom this time around. And sort of lets us do a bit of our own thing—which is quite good. No, it’s really good, actually. We’ve got a new writer, as well [Ed. Michael Goldenberg], who gives it sort of a different feel. So, no, it’s going to be interesting, this one.

G: I’m very curious what the culture is like on a Harry Potter set. I know it might change based on the director. Do the actors set the mood? Does it chnage with each director?

RG: Yeah, it’s quite amazing how each director brings their own atmosphere to the set. Mike Newell was quite funny, because he’s crazy. He did the fourth one, and he didn’t care what he said; he was really—would swear at us if we got it wrong, sort of shout at us. He was really funny. And obviously Chris Columbus was great for the first two, and Alfonso’s crazy—we’ve had some really good ones, actually. Yeah, so it was good.

G: When the cameras aren’t rolling, do you have much time to hang out with the other actors, or do you find yourself retreating to your trailer? What’s that like?

RG: Yeah, well, I’ve got, um—yeah, but, um…now I’ve finished school, I’ve got much more time off-set. And I’ve got a really good dressing room up there. I’ve got table tennis, pool, and TV and—yes, they know where I am, in my room, so it’s good.

G: What’s the greatest length you’ve gone to to avoid being recognized in public?

RG: (Chuckles.) I dunno, it’s um—it’s quite hard, really, having so much hair, in this color. It sort of does stand out. So it’s quite hard to—no, I mean, I try caps and that. I mean, they’re always really nice. And it never gets crazy, so. It’s never really been sort of too much of a problem.

G: The film is about lessons, and you learn your lessons from Julie Walters, who plays your mother in the Harry Potter films. What sort of acting lessons have you learned from working with folks like Julie Walters or Robbie Coltrane or the great British actors you’ve worked with?

RG: Yeah, yeah. I don’t know really. I mean, you don’t really—they don’t teach you anything particularly. It’s just really good just to sort of work with them, really. It’s pretty amazing, the sort of people who worked on the Harry Potter films. Erm. But no, it’s just really good to work with them. Working with Julie again is wicked ’cause she’s so funny. She’s really cool.

G: Do you ever observe methods that they’re using, or do you work with an acting coach? What’s your kind of acting method?

RG: I dunno, really. I suppose you do in a way, yeah. You’re always sort of watching what they’re doing, and that. No, it’s quite interesting. No, but in the early ones, we had, like, a voice coach, on One and Two and Three. Yeah, so that sort of helped us a little bit then…

G: And do you plan to ever trod the boards again?

RG: Erm, I dunno. I mean, I only ever experienced it on a really small scale, so it’d be a whole different experience, I think, on a big sort of stage. But I dunno. Yeah, I mean, definitely—it is quite a sort of a thrill about doing it; it does give you quite a buzz. But, yeah, maybe that’s something in the future. I know Dan [Radcliffe] is just about to do a big play in London, yeah.

G: Equus.

RG: Yeah.

G: Alright, well, thank you very much.

RG: Cool, yeah.


Original article found here: Groucho Reviews | October 18th, 2006


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You can’t Harry love

Rupert Grint Press: You can’t Harry love
You can’t Harry love

Nov 18 2005 Birmingham Post

Alison Jones finds the Harry Potter stars are still having a wizard time…

It seems like only the blink of an eye that three cute little pre-teens faced a waiting world and revealed they were to become the most famous students of magic since Merlin was a lad.

Back then Daniel Radcliffe was so innocent he admitted that he cried when he heard he’d got the role of Harry Potter.

Back then he was obsessed with World Wrestling Federation. These days he’s reading Zola and out all night at rock festivals.

And he’s not the only one who has changed. Rupert Grint, aka Ron Weasley, has swapped a broomstick for a gear stick and is taking driving lessons.

And Emma Watson – Hermione Granger – is maturing so quickly she is fully capable of winding producer David Heyman round her little finger at the press conference for the latest instalment of the wizardly saga.

The young actors’ emotional growth, as well as the physical, is reflected in that of their characters.

Not only are they facing deadlier enemies but they also have to contend with rioting hormones, the mortification of first crushes and the paralysing fear that that affection might not be returned.

“In a way growing up with Harry makes it easier to act in each of the films because I’ve been through all the stuff that he is going through fairly recently,” says Daniel, a worldly 16 to Harry’s comparatively callow 14.

He admits to having had a girlfriend though says he is single now. Harry too is dipping a tentative toe into romantic waters, drooling into his pumpkin juice over Cho Chang (played by newcomer Katie Leung).

Hermione predictably is already streets ahead of her two best friends, winning herself the Quidditch-playing version of Wayne Rooney, brooding sports star Victor Krum (Stanislav Ianevski).

It shows a whole new side to the bookish, bushy haired Hermione and one that Emma seems far more comfortable with.

“I don’t really have to act anymore, I’m so close to her and know her so well. There’s so much of me in her and her in me that it feels like I’m barely doing anything sometimes. I’m very fond of Hermione. She’s turned into someone a lot of people can identify with.”

Of the three, Daniel has emerged as the leader, accustomed to the limelight that comes with being the star of the show.

Dressed like an aspirant bank manager in shirt and tie, he is both gauche and precocious, a little too eager to entertain the assembled, with answers he is keen to make both smart and funny.

Rupert, a more typical teen in baggy tee shirt and shaggy hair, doesn’t look bovvered, apparently content with this natural order of things.

The oldest of the group he has already started to break away from Ron, squeezing in another film – Driving Lessons, co-starring Julie Walters and Laura Linney – after Goblet had wrapped.

A master of understatement, he admits he’s looking forward to the fifth film as “it’s Ron’s turn to sort of try Quidditch out.”

That is supposing the Quidditch makes the final cut, as the novels get progressively thicker and the story darker.

Director Mike Newell, the man who made Four Weddings and A Funeral, struggled with the size of Goblet, knowing that if he had kept everything in the novel he would have had to make two films.

“The book’s as big as a house brick. I felt the way of shedding the things that needed to be shed was to make it a thriller.”

So out go the comedy relief of the Dursleys and Hermione’s campaign to liberate house elves and in come firebreathing dragons, sexual innuendo, death and, finally, Lord Voldemort made flesh in the malevolently evil form of Ralph Fiennes.

“I’m in it and I was scared,” reveals Emma. “At the same time I think we will have gained from it. It’s always been about staying faithful to the book and you can’t avoid the fact that someone dies in it. There are some serious and deep topics in it and I love the fact they haven’t pulled the punches.”

The genuinely thrilling action sequences require some dangerous looking stunt work (Daniel had to have scuba diving training for a scene in which he swims among the Merpeople in the lake at Hogwarts).

However, by far the most terrifying scene – for the boys at least – was having to learn how to dance.

“I really wanted to be good at it because my parents were amazing competition-winning dancers,” explains Daniel,

But lack of rehearsal time meant that, in Daniel’s case, the results were not strictly ballroom.

“You’ll notice Mike very kindly didn’t show anything below my waist. You never saw my feet move, which is quite a good thing.”

Fortunately for potential girlfriends, dinner dancing comes fairly low on the list of ideal first date scenarios.

“I think I’m a slightly typical guy in that I don’t know where I’d take a date. What do girls like? Paintballing?”

“Cinema? Coffee? Food?” Emma interjects, clearly despairing of the ignorance of teenage boys.

Whatever relationships the trio have been involved in they have been fairly low key as the media have largely left them alone, except for when they are publicising the films, allowing them to lead relatively normal lives.

“People find it quite hard to believe that we can, but we are actually able to go out and do things,” says Daniel.

“For me, I only feel famous about two days a year which is the premieres.

“Having said that, it’s a possibility that that may change when we’re 18 because maybe the paparazzi and the photographers have been going slightly easy on us at this point so that might change, but I hope it continues.”

* Harry Potter Goblet of Fire is now in general release


Original article found The Birmingham Post | November 18th, 2005

BBC movies interview: Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint

Interviewed by Rob Carnevale

Fresh-faced prepubescent youngsters when they signed on for Potter duty in 2001, Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson and Rupert Grint have grown up. Now sporting lots of teenage hair and the attitude to go with it, the trio reprise their roles in the fourth instalment, The Goblet Of Fire which has been slapped with a 12A certificate for its darker content. Here they talk about how it may affect their younger fans, hormones and why glasses are cool.

How do you feel about growing up with your character?

DR: In a way growing up with Harry makes it easier to act in each of the films because I’ve been through all the stuff that he’s going through, like the hormones relatively recently. It’s quite fresh in my mind and it doesn’t stop after you’ve turned 14. Then I suppose it’s been made easier by the fact I’ve been doing it since I was 11. You get to know the character so well that it makes it easier to act in the long run.

EW: It feels like I don’t really have to act any more. There’s so much of me in Hermione and her in me that it feels like I’m barely doing anything sometimes.

How much do you think you have matured along with your character and did you make many suggestions to Mike Newell [the director] in terms of your own acting?

DR: I think we’ve grown up in the normal way. I think there’s nothing peculiar in the way we’ve matured.

In terms of suggestions to Mike, we spoke up. We are older now so it is good for us to feel like we’re not just child actors any more. We’ve grown up and are now able to make our own acting decisions, obviously in collaboration with Mike.

EW: I think one of the great things about Mike was that he really treated us like adults and he gave us the responsibility. I remember sometimes I would say: “Just tell me how to do it! Please just tell me, I can’t do it. I can’t get this right.” And he was like: “I can’t tell you and I’m not going to tell you how to do it. It’s got to come from you.” He guided and directed us. I think I’ve definitely, definitely learned a lot from Mike.

RG: When I did the first film, I’d never done anything like it before and it was all a bit scary. Now I think we’ve all probably learned quite a lot since then. It’s quite strange having a new director each time, you don’t really know what to expect.

This has been given a 12A rating; it’s much darker and scarier than the other films. Are you worried that your younger fans won’t get to see it?

EW: I think to some extent our audience were first fans of the Harry Potter books and so are growing up with the films. So it should work out OK. To some extent we might have lost some of the much younger audience.

I’m in it and I was scared! But at the same time I think that we will have gained from it. I think this one is much more of a thriller than it ever has been before. You can’t avoid the fact that someone dies in it at the end of the day. There are some very serious and deep topics in it. You just can’t avoid it. I love the fact that they haven’t pulled the punches, I love the fact that they have gone with it and that they’ve made something which is true to the book.

What was your most embarrassing moment while filming Harry Potter?

DR: My most embarrassing moment would have to have been the dancing. I mean, I really enjoyed it, I had a really good time, because the girl was just incredibly cool. But I’d like to point out that most other people had a lot more rehearsal at the dancing than me, and you’ll notice Mike very kindly didn’t show anything below my waist. It’s dancing from the waist up, so you never see my feet move, which is quite a good thing.

Q. Are you reconciled to the fact that the books are coming to an end? What will you do post Potter?

DR: Well, “reconciled” makes it sound like we’re not looking forward to it. I think we’re all really excited about it. We’ve got a while before the films end and we’re not all absolutely confirmed as doing them all. We’re all definitely doing the fifth but after that who knows? I’m also doing a new film that’s set in Australia. It’s centred around four young Australian boys who have grown up in a Catholic orphanage in the Outback. The orphanage comes into some money via a donor and they send the boys for their birthdays to the sea for a couple of weeks, and it’s just about the time they spend there. It’s five and a half weeks and no blue screen, and so it’s wonderful! And so I think we’re all looking forward to going on to other things.

EW: One of the things that got me so into acting and one of the things I loved about acting was being on a stage with a live audience. So I think maybe something in the theatre. But I’ve had so many scripts for films through, which is fantastic, and I’m reading away and hoping to find something I really fall in love with. I think I’d like to do something quite different from this, maybe something a bit smaller. But we’ll see!

After wearing the same glasses for four years, will Harry discover contacts?

DR: I tried contacts in the first film because in the book Harry’s eyes are supposed to be a brilliant green and mine are much bluer than they should be. So we put green contact lenses in but they were excruciatingly painful. So I don’t think we’ll be going back down the contact road if I can avoid it. But one thing that I think Harry Potter has actually done – because I used to wear glasses a lot – is to make them kind of cool. JK Rowling has stuck up for any person who has ever been called four eyes or ever been teased about it.

In an ideal world – and let your fantasies run riot – who would you take to your own Yule Ball?

DR: I watched Garden State quite recently and fell in love with Natalie Portman so it would maybe be her or Scarlett Johansson or someone like that. You said let your fantasies run wild, so that’s what I’ve done!

Harry Potter And The Goblet Of Fire is released in UK cinemas on Friday, 18th November 2005.


Original article found here: BBC Movies | November 3rd, 2005

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All Stars December 2004

What did you feel seeing yourself on the big screen for the first time?
Rupert: “It was a strange feeling! It scared me a little+ But then I sort of got accustomed to it, so now it’s even cool.”

What it’s like to work with Alfonso Cuaron and Mike Newell after Chris Columbus?
Rupert:”We were taken aback actually when we found out that there’ll be a new director in the POA. We had got accustomed to Chris, made friends with him+ But Alfonso turned out so cheeky, that we had a good time on the set. It’s also interesting to work with Mike.”

In the POA your characters changed school uniform with jeans. Did you feel relief taking off uniform?
Rupert: “It’s all right for you, but Ron has to wear these awful stretched sweaters. So then on the filming I hadn’t got a chance to wear normal clothes.”

If you could have an influence on the destiny of your characters, what would you invent for them?
Rupert: “I’d like Ron going across to the evil. It’d be cool: I want badly to play the negative character.”

Was there something that you didn’t like on the filming of POA?
Rupert: “I didn’t like my rat. When we were in Scotland she tinkled on me.”

What does it mean for you to grow up?
Rupert:”My voice has become deeper. And the height, on the contrary, has become higher. For now it’s all what I can say about growing up.”


Scans available here: RGus-gallery | December 2004
Translations by Maru

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